VITAMINS AND MINERAL SUPPLEMENTS

January 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

It may be taken as a given that vitamins and minerals at optimum levels promote growth, health, stamina, reproductive ability, disease resistance detoxification and longevity. If we accept the truth of that statement, we are left with an important question. “Do dogs and cats eating BARF require extra vitamins and minerals by way of supplementation?’ When seasons are good, our pets’ wild counterparts have access to wide variety of fresh whole raw foods, which are rich in vitamins and minerals. These foods include fresh raw meant and bones, raw organ meat and fresh, raw totally pulverized vegetables, all of which are vital components of the BARF diet. In other words, a properly formulate BARF diet will contain an abundance of vitamins and minerals, which will be delivered in a biologically appropriate form and should therefore not need to be supplemented. This brings us to the question:


“WHAT ARE THE RULES FOR SUPPLEMENTING VITAMINS AND MINERALS?’

For most pet animals being fed a broadly based, well-constructed BARF diet, vitamin and mineral supplementation will usually not be necessary. However, food grown on poor quality soils, harvested before ripe  and transported long distances, may have lower levels of vitamins and minerals than expected. In addition, some animals with specific needs, in particular life stages, or suffering particular health problems, may need supplementation of vitamins or possibly minerals, over and above basic BARF.

Getting in Touch with your Dog

January 23, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

THE TAIL TOUCH (Reduces fear and aggression) With Tail Work and the Tail T Touches, you can help your dog overcome fear and timidity (including fright from loud noises, such as thunder). This work can also be helpful with dogs that are aggressive toward other dogs, or “fear biters.” The Tail T Touch eases pain and furthers recovery after injury or surgery (in addition, of course, to vet care), Particularly with dogs that have problems getting up. It helps dogs regain their mobility: small gentle circles, and very soft tail pulls can greatly improve the lives of dogs with hip dysplasia.  They ease stiffness, which helps dogs lie down and get up.

PREDICTABILITY…………..

January 13, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

Another factor that will influence the strength of conditioning is the correlation between the bait you’re using ans the resource removal (or approach and touch). If the exercises sometimes occur without the bait or the bait sometimes is given without the exercise, the correlation will be lower and the strength of your CER compromised.  For this reason, son’t be tempted to do exercises with low value threats for convenience on occasion and don’t use the high value bait you’re using in D&C exercises for other training endeavors or as general dog treats.  Reserve it for its sole purpose.

BACH FLOWER REMEDIES……..

January 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

HONEYSUCKLE – For the dog who has lost a long time companion or person. The do has become withdrawn, subdue and unenthusiastic toward people. Also for homesickness or being left at a boarding kennel temporarily.

ROSEWOOD………..

January 6, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

ROSEWOOD…..essential oil is an extremely gentle, tonic oil which is excellent for shin conditions. It is most commonly used in perfumery, but has aromatherapy used as a cellular stimulant ans aids in tissue regeneration. Its scent is very similar to Geranium and Palmarosa. Rosewood is frequently adulterated with Palmarosa, or Palmarosa is sold as Rosewood. These oils are very similar in scent and action, so this is not a problem for therapeutic value. The issue is that many will charge more for the Rosewood but be selling you Pamarosa instead. The oil has antibacterial and antiviral properties, and ticks are repelled by the scent of it, in combination with rather oils such as Myrrh, Bay Leaf and Opoponax.

Recognizing Guarding

January 2, 2015 by  
Filed under Blog

Most guarders will be presented as behaving aggressively to family members rather than strangers. Although many resources guarders will guard from just about anybody who is around. family members are more likely to be around enough to come across the behavior. Sometimes the owner will identify that the issue is the dog’s control of or proximity to a certain resource, but other times will not know why the dog is being aggressive. It may even appear to a bewildered owner to be completely unpredictable. This is especially likely when there is a hidden combo, or when the resource or body part has simply not been recognized as being “hot”.

MANAGEMENT

December 30, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

MANAGEMENT MEANS AVOIDING THE PROBLEM OR TRIGGER FOR A BEHAVIOR THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL. It can serve as a valid alternative to behavior modification sometimes or be used in conjunction with behavior modification.  Managing during treatment serves the dual purposes of preventing mishap while the dog is in training and protecting the program.  For instance, if an object guarder has been worked part way up a hierarchy so that he is reliable for bully sticks but has not yet had exercises addressing pigs’ ears, and ill-fated confrontation over a pigs’ ear on day could set progress back even with bully sticks. The first line of defense for managing a resource guarder is to purge the dog’s environment of all items he has not yet mastered in exercises.  Think of it as hiding all the grade 12 quizzes from the grade 8 student (until he has passed grade 12).

Grief

December 23, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

Dogs and cats have highly developed emotional bodies, with less developed mental levels. They feel, and feel deeply, although they may not always understand just what they problem is or why something has happened to them. When the human they have bonded with suddenly leaves or dies, or when an animal friend moves away or dies, a pet can be overwhelmed with grief. If the cat of dog must then adjust to living with a new family, they grief, confusion and emotional upset are increased. If the animal suddenly finds herself in a shelter ans all alone, she may experience pain that becomes difficult to heal in the most caring new home. Dogs and cats experience anger, depression, apathy, lethargy, loss of the will to live, fear, terror, and may also place blame on others rightly or not. Where understanding of causes is limited, these emotions can be worsened and acted out in negative behaviors. Dogs bond totally and for life. Cats, who are more loners and place oriented, are less sociable. They react deeply to stress and change.

The Heart In Harmony and Disease

December 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


The Fire Element rules the heart and small intestine. In Chinese healing tradition,the heart includes not only the organ itself but also the concept—shared by Western people —of the heart as a mental/emotional center, reflected in our phrases: “Have a heart!”, “Put you heart into it!”, or “Learn by heart.” Dean Ornish, M.D., heart specialist at the University of California at San Francisco, has developed from his experience a a similar awareness: “I think the mind is where heart disease begins for many people.” The Romanized word for heart in China is xin, which is often translated as “heart-mind.” Thus, according to the Chinese medical definition, the heart not only regulates blood circulation by also controls consciousness, spirit, sleep, memory, and houses the mind. In this way the heart, together with the liver, is related to the nervous system and brain. The advantage of using this expanded definition is that it accords with reality—the heart acupuncture meridian affects both the physical heart and the mind. It is well-known that emotions affect the actual functioning of the heart, seen in the speed and strength of the pulses. We will refer to the various aspects of this expanded “heart-mind” definition as appropriate.
The heart in harmony: Those with healthy hearts are genuinely friendly. They are also humble, not out of convention but because they actually feel small in comparison to the wonders they perceive with their open hearts and aware minds. Clarity is a central attribute of those with a harmonious heart-mind. They seem to see effortlessly through problems to arrive at brilliant solutions.

The Fire Element rules the heart and small intestine. In Chinese healing tradition,the heart includes not only the organ itself but also the concept—shared by Western people —of the heart as a mental/emotional center, reflected in our phrases: “Have a heart!”, “Put you heart into it!”, or “Learn by heart.” Dean Ornish, M.D., heart specialist at the University of California at San Francisco, has developed from his experience a a similar awareness: “I think the mind is where heart disease begins for many people.” The Romanized word for heart in China is xin, which is often translated as “heart-mind.” Thus, according to the Chinese medical definition, the heart not only regulates blood circulation by also controls consciousness, spirit, sleep, memory, and houses the mind. In this way the heart, together with the liver, is related to the nervous system and brain. The advantage of using this expanded definition is that it accords with reality—the heart acupuncture meridian affects both the physical heart and the mind. It is well-known that emotions affect the actual functioning of the heart, seen in the speed and strength of the pulses. We will refer to the various aspects of this expanded “heart-mind” definition as appropriate. The heart in harmony: Those with healthy hearts are genuinely friendly. They are also humble, not out of convention but because they actually feel small in comparison to the wonders they perceive with their open hearts and aware minds. Clarity is a central attribute of those with a harmonious heart-mind. They seem to see effortlessly through problems to arrive at brilliant solutions.


Eye Out of Socket

December 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


The eyeballs are tightly anchored in sockets of protective bone, and tension from the eyelids holds them in place. But a blow to the head or a fight with another animal can cause a cat’s or dogs eye to pop out. This is especially common in flat-faced dogs such as pekingese and Shih Tzus because their eye sockets are so shallow. A displaced eyeball looks awful-it usually remains attached and just protrudes, although trauma such as a car accident can force it out so it lies upon the cheek-but it isn’t life-threatening.
Protect the injured eye. An eye that’s out of the socket must be treated by a veterinarian. Before leaving the house, place a gauze pad or lint-free cloth that’s been soaked with lukewarm sterile saline.

The eyeballs are tightly anchored in sockets of protective bone, and tension from the eyelids holds them in place. But a blow to the head or a fight with another animal can cause a cat’s or dogs eye to pop out. This is especially common in flat-faced dogs such as pekingese and Shih Tzus because their eye sockets are so shallow. A displaced eyeball looks awful-it usually remains attached and just protrudes, although trauma such as a car accident can force it out so it lies upon the cheek-but it isn’t life-threatening. 
Protect the injured eye. An eye that’s out of the socket must be treated by a veterinarian. Before leaving the house, place a gauze pad or lint-free cloth that’s been soaked with lukewarm sterile saline.


Comments